Phragmites. What is it? How did it get here? Why is it significant? Let me tell you!

The common reed, Phragmites australis, is an aggressively invasive plant species that can be found in many wetlands in the region. Phragmites is an exotic species, which means it is not native to our area. It was brought over to North America from Eurasia to be used as an ornamental plant in aquatic areas.

Phragmites is wind-pollinated and produces a large flowering head in late summer

Phragmites is wind-pollinated and produces a large flowering head in late summer

Phragmites grows in dense stands that can reach 15 feet in height. These groupings choke out other plant species, effectively forming a monoculture. The plant also produces toxins that inhibit the growth of competing plant species. In addition, stands of Phragmites are unsuitable habitat for many animals because it grows too thick.

At Sylvan Prairie Park, our Conservation Team is working to reduce and eventually eradicate Phragmites. In September, we treat the plants with herbicide to kill the new growth before it can spread. We then return in the winter to cut down the standing dead stalks to open up the area. Over several years of management, the stands of Phragmites have noticeably decreased, giving way to native plant species that are starting to flourish.

Cutting Phragmites

Volunteers from University of Toledo’s Department of Environmental Sciences help TOPS cut dead stands of phragmites at Sylvan Prairie Park.

Phragmites grows in dense monocultures, choking out native plant life

Phragmites grows in dense monocultures, choking out native plant life