Bergamot

 

The fourth and final week of the Olander Youth Conservation Corps has come to a close. Although we had some rain this week, it didn’t stop us from having a great time and getting a lot of work done. We started the week with a stream survey at Harroun Community Park, then spent a day at Olander’s greenhouse at Sylvan, and ended the week learning about soil science at Olander Park and Southview Oak Savanna.

On Tuesday, we visited Harroun Community Park in Sylvania. We started the day by cutting down woody invasive plants along one of the park’s walking paths–focusing primarily on common buckthorn, honeysuckle, and autumn olive. After a few hours, the rain clouds that had been threatening us all morning finally broke and a light rain started falling. We were lucky, however, and the worst of the rain passed after about twenty minutes. Once the rainfall lessened, we began our stream survey of Tenmile Creek. Dr. Todd Crail of the University of Toledo led our survey, and taught the kids how to use seines to sample for fish and invertebrates in the water as well as outline the connection between a river and the land around it. Catherine Zimmerman, of The Meadow Project, also joined us to film the kids as they surveyed the stream. Ms. Zimmerman is currently creating Hometown Habitat, a documentary exploring the importance of the native flora relationship to a healthy local ecosystem. Everyone had a great time wading in the stream and looking for fish. It was a great way to start the final week of the Youth Corps.

 

Conner and Emily attack  common buckthorn with loppers.

Conner and Emily attack common buckthorn with loppers.

Sarah neatly stacks the cut plants.

Sarah neatly stacks the cut plants.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Todd Crail shows the kids how to use a seine.

Dr. Todd Crail shows the kids how to use a seine.

The kids used seines to catch fish and invertebrates in the stream.

The kids used seines to catch fish and invertebrates in the stream.

Dr. Todd Crail explains the relationship between stream and land habitats.

Dr. Todd Crail explains the relationship between stream and land habitats.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday, we spent time at Olander Park and Sylvan Prairie Park. We started the day along the shore of Lake Olander, rolling erosion matting on some of the sand blowouts and planting native plants in the matting. The plants and erosion matting will help to slow the erosion of the banks and protect the shoreline of the lake. Next we headed to the park system’s greenhouse at Sylvan Prairie. The kids had a blast getting their hands really dirty while transplanting grey-headed coneflower. It was a perfect day to work outside!

Livie and Alayna roll out the erosion matting as Maya and Taylor plant behind them.

Livie and Alayna roll out the erosion matting as Maya and Taylor plant behind them.

Anna and Patrick work together to make holes in the erosion mat and plant native plants in the sand.

Anna and Patrick work together to make holes in the erosion mat and plant native plants in the sand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cindy of the Olander Park System shows the kids how to wash pots as she goes through each step of the station.

Cindy of the Olander Park System shows the kids how to wash pots as she goes through each step of the station.

The kids made a transplanting station: pots are washed, filled with soil, the soil is watered and kneaded until it is wet throughout, then the coneflower is placed in the soil.

The kids made a transplanting station: pots are washed, filled with soil, the soil is watered and kneaded until it is wet throughout, then the coneflower is placed in the soil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the last day, more rain caused original plans to be modified slightly until the rain stopped late in the morning. Dr. Mike Weintraub from The University of Toledo came to teach the kids about how compost breaks down to become soil, then showed part of a documentary, The Symphony of the Soil. Once the rain stopped, we headed to the north end of the park to conduct an earthworm survey. Dr. Weintraub taught the Corps that earthworms are not actually native to our region. They are preferred by farmers because they improve the soil to be more organic and rich in nutrients.

To conduct an earthworm survey, a mixture of hot mustard powder and water was poured onto the soil. The kids monitored their selected location for worms wriggling out of the soil. Once out of the soil, the worms were rinsed with water to remove the residue from their skin. The Corps used an earthworm identification sheet to determine each species they found.

They also determined the type of soil with a texture by feel method. They followed a dichotomous key and manipulated the soil step by step until they came to the conclusion that it was a loamy sand soil type.

Finally, we went to the Southview Oak Savanna to remove nonnative weeds including yellow goatsbeard, deptford pink, and cow vetch. The rain caught back up to us, and we were soaked by the time we headed back to Olander to conclude our second year of The Olander Youth Conservation Corps.

Dr. Weintraub, Patrick, and Anna wait for worms to come to the surface.

Dr. Weintraub, Patrick, and Anna wait for worms to come to the surface.

Alayna and Maya use their earthworm guide to identify the species they found.

Alayna and Maya use their earthworm guide to identify the species they found.

Lauren and Emily determined they had loamy sand through a texture by feel method.

Lauren and Emily determined they had loamy sand through a texture by feel method.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you to all of the Corps members this year who helped make the second annual Olander Youth Conservation Corps a success! We were happy to have worked with and taught all of the Corps members this year.

blue flag iris